Policy on Unlawful Discrimination & Sexual Misconduct

Policy on Unlawful Discrimination & Sexual Misconduct*

*sexual misconduct includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Policy Basis and Application
  3. Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment
  4. Sexual Harassment and Misconduct
  5. Sexual Misconduct and Definitions
  6. Consensual Relations between Faculty and Students and between Supervisors and Employees
  7. Important Principles
  8. Prevention and Education Programs
  9. Informal Resolution of Complaints That Do Not Involve Sexual Misconduct
  10. Formal Resolution of Complaints
  11. Support Services and Resources for Those Who Have Experienced Sexual Misconduct
  12. Yearly Report on Unlawful Harassment and Sexual Misconduct to the Council of the University Senate
  13. Compliance and Locating this Policy
  14. Related Policies

 

I. INTRODUCTION

The University of Chicago is a community of scholars dedicated to research, academic excellence, and the pursuit and cultivation of learning. Members of the University community cannot thrive unless each is accepted as an autonomous individual and is treated without regard to characteristics irrelevant to participation in the life of the University. Freedom of expression is vital to our shared goal of the pursuit of knowledge and should not be restricted by a multitude of rules. At the same time, unlawful discrimination, including harassment, compromises the integrity of the University. It is the intention of the University to take necessary action to prevent, correct, and, where indicated, discipline unlawful discrimination.

Sexual misconduct violates the law and the standards of our community, is unacceptable at the University of Chicago, and may constitute a form of discrimination.  Experiencing sexual misconduct can be devastating to the person who experiences it directly and can adversely impact family, friends, and the larger community. Regardless of the definitions provided below, people who believe they have experienced any sexual misconduct are encouraged to report the incident and to seek medical care and support as soon as possible.

II. POLICY BASIS AND APPLICATION

This policy is the basis for the University's commitment to conform to the laws regarding nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and other unlawful forms of harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. It applies to students and other program participants, staff, postdoctoral researchers, faculty, and other academic appointees, volunteers, as well as to anyone on whom the University has formally conferred a title, regardless of employment status. The University provides education and prevention resources, offers numerous support services and referrals for anyone who has experienced one of these crimes, encourages and facilitates reporting and prosecution, and is committed to disciplining anyone who violates this policy. The University may also investigate, and, if appropriate, adjudicate, alleged violations of this policy reported by individuals outside the institution regarding individuals within the University if, for example, the alleged violation occurred on University property. The University may also investigate, and, if appropriate, adjudicate, alleged violations of this policy that occur off campus between or among University-affiliated individuals if those alleged violations may create a hostile educational or work environment for others.

III. UNLAWFUL DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT

Discrimination based on factors irrelevant to admission, employment, or program participation violates the University's principles.  In keeping with its long-standing traditions and policies, the University of Chicago considers students, employees, applicants for admission or employment, and those seeking access to programs on the basis of individual merit.  The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a physical or mental disability unrelated to ability, veteran status, military status, unfavorable discharge from military service, citizen status, genetic information, marital status, parental status, ancestry, source of income, credit history, housing status, order of protection status, actual or perceived association with such a person or other protected classes under the law.  Such discrimination is unlawful.

Unlawful harassment based on one of the factors listed above is verbal or physical conduct that is so severe or pervasive that it has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or educational program participation, or that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment.

A person's subjective belief that behavior is offensive, intimidating or hostile does not make that behavior unlawful harassment. The behavior must be objectively unreasonable. Expression occurring in an academic, educational or research context is considered as a special case and is broadly protected by academic freedom. Such expression will not constitute unlawful harassment unless (in addition to satisfying the above definition) it is targeted at a specific person or persons, is abusive, and serves no bona fide academic purpose.

Unlawful harassment includes same sex harassment and peer harassment among students, staff, other academic appointees, postdoctoral researchers or faculty. Unlawful harassment by a faculty member, instructor, or teaching assistant of a student over whom he or she has authority, or by a supervisor of a subordinate, is particularly serious.

IV. SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND MISCONDUCT

Sexual misconduct encompasses a range of conduct, from sexual assault (a criminal act that the U.S. Department of Education defines as sexual harassment) to conduct such as unwanted touching or persistent unwelcome comments, e-mails, or pictures of an insulting or degrading sexual nature, which may constitute unlawful harassment, depending upon the specific circumstances and context in which the conduct occurs. For example, sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or sexually-directed remarks or behavior constitute sexual harassment when (i) submission to or rejection of such conduct is made, explicitly or implicitly, a basis for an academic or employment decision, or a term or condition of either; or (ii) such conduct directed against an individual persists despite its rejection.

V. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT AND DEFINITIONS

The University's definition of sexual assault encompasses the State of Illinois Criminal Code's terminology and definitions of both sexual assault (frequently referred to as rape) and sexual abuse. The University incorporates the State's definitions of several other important terms, including domestic violence, dating violence and stalking; complies with the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (“SaVE Act”) provisions of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (“VAWA”); and recognizes that sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are not gender-specific crimes. To aid searches, definitions are provided in alphabetical order.

"Accused" means a person accused of conduct prohibited by this policy and does not imply pre-judgment.

"Consent" is the freely given agreement to the act of sexual conduct or sexual penetration in question. The lack of explicit consent does not imply consent. The lack of verbal or physical resistance or the submission by the victim resulting from the use of force or threat of force by the accused does not constitute consent. The manner of dress of the victim at the time of the offense does not constitute consent. A person who initially consents to sexual penetration or sexual conduct is deemed not to have consented to any sexual penetration or sexual conduct that occurs after he or she withdraws consent during the course of that sexual penetration or sexual conduct.

Use of alcohol or drugs may impair an individual's capacity to consent freely and may render an individual incapable of giving consent.

The age of consent in Illinois is 17 but rises to 18 if the accused holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim.

“Dating violence” means the use or threat of use of physical, mental or emotional abuse, or sexual violence by a person who is in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

“Domestic violence” means harassment, interference with personal liberty, intimidation of a dependent, physical abuse, or willful deprivation by a person who is or was a family or household member of the victim. A family or household member includes: a spouse, former spouse, parent, child, stepchild, or other person related by blood or by present or prior marriage; a person who shares or formerly shared a common dwelling; a person who has or allegedly has a child in common or shares a blood relationship through a child; a person who has a dating or engagement relationship; a personal assistant to a person with a disability; and a caregiver, as defined in the Illinois Criminal Code of 2012.

"Force or threat of force" means the use of force or violence, or the threat of force or violence, including but not limited to (1) when the accused threatens to use force or violence on the victim or on any other person, and the victim under the circumstances reasonably believes that the accused has the ability to execute that threat or (2) when the accused has overcome the victim by use of superior strength or size, physical restraint or physical confinement.  

“Harassment” as a form of unlawful discrimination means verbal or physical conduct that is so severe or pervasive that it has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational program participation, or that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment.

“Harassment” for purposes of domestic violence is knowing conduct that is not necessary to accomplish a purpose, would cause emotional distress to a reasonable person and does cause emotional distress to the victim. 

“Interference with personal liberty” is committing or threatening physical abuse, harassment, intimidation, or willful deprivation to force a victim to engage in conduct from which that person has the right to abstain, or to abstain from conduct in which that person has a right to engage.

“Intimidation of a dependent” is subjecting a person who is a dependent because of age, health or disability to participation in or the witnessing of physical force, physical confinement or restraint of another person.

 “Physical abuse” includes sexual abuse and means any of the following: (1) the knowing or reckless use of physical force, confinement, or restraint; (2) knowing, repeated, and unnecessary sleep deprivation; and/or (3) knowing or reckless behavior that creates an immediate risk of physical harm.

“Responsible employee” means any faculty member, other academic appointee, or staff member who would reasonably be expected to have the authority or duty to report or take action to redress sexual misconduct.

“Sexual assault” means:

•        An act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct by the use of force or threat of force, including threatening or endangering the life of the victim or any other person; or

•        An act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct where the accused knew that the victim was unable to understand the nature of the act or was unable to give knowing consent; or

•        An act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who was under age 17 when the act was committed, or with a victim who was under age 18 when the act was committed and the accused was age 17 or more and held a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim; or

•        An act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct in which the accused delivered (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) to the victim without his or her consent, or by threat or deception, and for other than medical purposes, any controlled substance.

"Sexual conduct" means any intentional or knowing touching or fondling by the victim or the accused, either directly or through clothing, of the sex organs, anus, or breast of the victim or the accused, or any part of the body of a child under 13 years of age, or any transfer or transmission of semen by the accused upon any part of the clothed or unclothed body of the victim, for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of the victim or the accused.

"Sexual penetration" means any contact, however slight, between the sex organ or anus of one person and an object, the sex organ, mouth or anus of another person, or any intrusion, however slight, of any part of the body of one person or of any animal or object into the sex organ or anus of another person, including but not limited to cunnilingus, fellatio, or anal penetration.

“Stalking” means a course of conduct (two or more acts) directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her or his safety or the safety of a third person, or to suffer emotional distress. Stalking behavior includes, but is not limited to: following a person; appearing at a person's home, work, or school; making unwanted phone calls; sending unwanted emails or text messages; leaving objects for a person; vandalizing a person's property; injuring a person’s pet; and monitoring or placing a person under surveillance.

"Victim" means a person alleging to have been subjected to conduct prohibited by this policy and does not imply pre-judgment.

“Willful deprivation” is the purposeful denial of medication, medical care, shelter, food, or other assistance to a person who requires such things because of age, health or disability, thereby putting that person at risk of physical, mental, or emotional harm.

VI. CONSENSUAL RELATIONS BETWEEN FACULTY AND STUDENTS AND BETWEEN SUPERVISORS AND EMPLOYEES

Romantic relationships that might be appropriate in other contexts may, within a university, create the appearance or fact of an abuse of power or of undue advantage. Because those who teach are entrusted with guiding students, judging their work, giving grades for papers and courses, and recommending students to colleagues, instructors are in a delicate position of trust and authority. This teacher-student relationship must not be jeopardized by probable doubt of intent, fairness of professional judgment, or the appearance to other students of favoritism. Supervisory employment relations involve similar obligations of fairness and seeming fairness in the management and evaluation of employees.

One of the tenets of our policy and our commitment to a climate free from sexual harassment has been the view that it is unwise and inappropriate for faculty or other instructors who have romantic relations with students to teach such students in a class, supervise them in research or graduate work or recommend them for fellowships, awards, or employment, or for employees who have romantic relations with employees under their supervision to maintain their supervisory status.

Such romantic relationships may sometimes develop. Prudence and the best interest of students and employees dictate that in such circumstances of romantic involvement, the faculty member, instructor or supervisor should promptly report the relationship to the appropriate chair, dean or supervisor, who will then help find other instructional or supervisory arrangements in a way that safeguards the welfare of the student or subordinate. Such alternatives may include, for example, ceasing to have the student take courses with the instructor or moving the subordinate employee to a different reporting relationship. Faculty and supervisors should keep in mind that initial consent to a romantic relationship does not preclude a charge of sexual harassment in the future.

VII. IMPORTANT PRINCIPLES

Confidentiality

The University of Chicago will make every reasonable effort to preserve an individual's privacy and protect the confidentiality of information related to unlawful discrimination, harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking within the parameters imposed by law. In order to notify the community about the occurrence of a serious crime or pattern of crimes that might put the public at risk, the University may issue a safety awareness alert (a brief description including time and location). The University is also required by law to tabulate and annually report to the public statistics for sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and other crimes, as defined under federal law and the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.1

These statistics and the list of people to whom a crime may be reported for it to be included in the statistics appear in the hard copy Common Sense publication and online at http://commonsense.uchicago.edu/. Neither safety awareness alerts nor campus crime statistics contain specific victim-identifying information.

The confidentiality of disciplinary proceedings deserves special mention. Honoring the confidentiality of disciplinary proceedings and their determinations is the responsibility of the accused, the victim, the institution, and all others participating in or privy to those proceedings.

Institutional Obligation to Respond

Because sexual assault is a serious crime that may threaten the community as a whole, in some instances the University may be obliged to pursue an alleged sexual assault through internal disciplinary procedures without the cooperation of the individual alleging the assault. Always in such instances, the University will inform the individual of its obligation to address a community safety issue.

Non-Retaliation

The University prohibits retaliation against any person who exercises any rights or responsibilities under this policy.

VIII. PREVENTION AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The University provides numerous education programs and awareness campaigns to prevent and promote awareness of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, rape, and acquaintance rape.  In addition to covering the information addressed in this policy, these programs will, among other things, provide information regarding options for bystander intervention, and information on risk reduction strategies.

IX. INFORMAL RESOLUTION OF COMPLAINTS THAT DO NOT INVOLVE SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

The University's procedures for handling incidents depend on the nature of the incident, the relationship of the accused to the institution, and, to the extent possible, the wishes of the person bringing forward the complaint. Under Title IX, the University has an obligation to investigate all allegations of sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, rape, and acquaintance rape about which a “responsible employee” knows or should have known. Any University employee who would reasonably be expected to have the authority or duty to report or take action to redress sexual misconduct is a “responsible employee.”

Unlawful harassment complaints without a sexual misconduct dimension may be resolved informally via advising and mediation. It is important to note that the procedures do not preempt other formal or informal channels available within the University.

Persons who believe that their educational or work experience may be compromised by unlawful harassment or discrimination should feel free to discuss the problem with a department chair, dean, or supervisor and, if desired, to request that department chair, dean, or supervisor to speak informally to the person complained about. If this does not resolve the matter, or if the individual prefers, the concerned party may make use of any or all of the following two avenues for resolution. No one at the University may reprimand or discriminate against an individual for having initiated an inquiry or complaint in good faith.

Advising

An individual who feels he or she has been unlawfully harassed in an incident without a sexual misconduct dimension may bring the matter to a Complaint Advisor, whose role is to discuss with the complainant available options on how to proceed (a list of current Advisors also appears in the University Directory). The advising is intended to provide a forum for free and open discussion between the complainant and the Advisor. Consequently, no record will be kept of the advising conversation other than an incident report that will not contain the names of either the complainant or the accused and that will be used only to keep a yearly record of the number of different types of reported incidents. Every attempt will be made to protect the privacy of the individuals involved in an advising conversation about unlawful harassment or discrimination. If the Advisor learns of allegations that are so serious they obligate the University to act, then, upon the recommendation of the Coordinating Officer or Provost, there will be an administrative response, which may include a formal investigation and will include notifying germane administrative or managerial personnel (e.g., department chair and/or dean in matters involving faculty members and other academic appointees, and supervisors, managers and/or directors in matters involving staff employees).

Complaint Advisors are selected and supervised by the Coordinating Officer (a position filled by a member of the Provost's Office) for a two-year term and drawn from a variety of different areas throughout the University. (For example, they may be Resident Heads, Deans of Students, the Ombudsperson, or faculty members). The number of Advisors is sufficiently large that individuals from all areas in the University are able to have access to the Advisors. Advisors are required to participate in a program designed to make them familiar with the issues involved in dealing with unlawful harassment or discrimination cases.

Mediation

When a complaint is brought to the Complaint Advisor, the complainant may ask for a mediated meeting with the accused. The goal of the mediation procedure is to provide a forum where the complainant and the accused can, with the aid of a third party, come to a mutually agreed upon resolution. Consequently, mediation will occur only if both the complainant and the accused are willing to participate in the process. The Complaint Advisor may serve as mediator or suggest a third party such as the Coordinating Officer or a faculty member of the Panel on Unlawful Harassment to act as mediator. Mediation will not be used to resolve complaints of sexual misconduct, which require more formal investigation.

X. FORMAL INVESTIGATION AND RESOLUTION OF COMPLAINTS

Formal Investigation for Complaints That Do Not Involve Sexual Misconduct

Any person who wishes to discuss a possible complaint of unlawful harassment that does not involve sexual misconduct may use the informal advising and mediation avenues described above. But either the complainant or the accused may at any time ask that the matter under discussion be handled formally rather than informally. The appropriate procedure for a formal complaint depends on who is being accused of harassment.

If the person accused of harassment without a sexual misconduct component is a student, a formal complaint should be addressed within the procedures for student discipline described in the Student Manual. The complaint should be addressed to the Associate Dean of Students in the University for Disciplinary Affairs.

If the person accused of harassment without a sexual misconduct component is a staff employee of the University, a staff member from Human Resources will guide the employee through the appropriate formal review process. Both parties must be informed of the determination.

If the person accused of harassment without a sexual misconduct component is a faculty member or other academic appointee (such as a Research Associate, Lecturer, or Librarian), the formal complaint procedures described below apply.

Formal Investigation for Complaints of Sexual Misconduct

The appropriate University disciplinary avenue is determined by the status of the person accused of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. Anyone may choose to bring forward a complaint within the University instead of, or in addition to, seeking redress outside the institution in the legal system. Someone with a complaint of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking may also opt to pursue his or her case via the legal system without engaging the University's disciplinary process, although, in the interest of community safety, the University may be obliged to pursue an alleged sexual assault through internal disciplinary procedures. Unlike the State of Illinois, the University does not impose a time limit after which it will not consider formal complaints of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. However, timely disciplinary processes take advantage of the most recent recollections and evidence and can facilitate more prompt resolution to what is often a traumatic and painful situation for the victim.

If the person accused of sexual misconduct is a student, a formal complaint should be addressed within the procedures for student discipline described in the Student Manual. The complaint should be addressed to the Associate Dean of Students in the University for Disciplinary Affairs.

If the person accused of sexual misconduct is a staff employee of the University, a staff member from Human Resources will guide the employee through the appropriate formal review process. Both parties must be informed of the determination.

If the person accused of sexual misconduct is a faculty member or other academic appointee (such as a Research Associate, Lecturer, or Librarian), the formal complaint procedures described below apply.

In each of the three venues, the University is committed to providing a prompt, impartial, and thorough investigation and resolution. Such an investigation may occur alongside, rather than in lieu of, an independent law enforcement investigation. University officials participating in disciplinary proceedings involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking receive ongoing training on issues related to these offenses, as well as training on how to conduct an investigation and hearing.  In such proceedings, a preponderance of the evidence standard is used. The accused and victim are entitled to bring a person of their choice to the proceedings, whose role is limited to providing support, not acting as an advocate or participant. Further, the accused and victim are simultaneously informed, in writing, of the determination of the proceedings and the procedures for seeking review of the decision.

Sanctions for a member of the University community found to have sexually assaulted, committed an act of domestic or dating violence against, or stalked another person may include termination of employment or expulsion. If, after a University of Chicago degree is awarded, the Dean of Students is informed of misconduct that occurred before the degree was awarded, disciplinary proceedings may be initiated. If the University-wide Disciplinary Committee is convened, the Committee may recommend revocation of the degree.

Procedures for Faculty and Other Academic Appointees

Once a formal investigation has been requested, the Panel on Unlawful Harassment will move to comply as quickly as possible. The Panel consists of three faculty members appointed by the Provost for three-year terms (with the possibility of reappointment) and the Student Ombudsperson (as a non-voting student member). The Coordinating Officer will sit with the Panel ex officio and does not vote. A list of the current members of the Panel on Unlawful Harassment can be found at http://www.uchicago.edu/about/boards_committees_and_councils/.

It is the task of the Panel to determine the facts. At any time in its proceedings, the Panel may decide that the complaint should be rejected as clearly unfounded. The Panel will be provided with written statements from the complainant and the accused, if necessary, will interview persons with knowledge bearing on the matter, including the complainant and the accused. The proceedings will be kept confidential.

If the complaint is found to have merit, the Panel will relay its findings to the Provost who will take appropriate action (for example, a reprimand, leave of absence without pay, invocation of statutory procedures for termination). If the complaint is found to have no merit (or if the facts cannot be established), the complaint will be dismissed. Both parties must be informed of the determination. A report of a justified complaint, including the Provost's action, is placed in the accused's official file in the Provost's Office.

XI. SUPPORT SERVICES AND RESOURCES FOR THOSE WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

The needs of someone who has experienced sexual misconduct such as sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking vary from person to person and may vary over time. The University offers a diverse array of services and external resources, many of which may be accessed 24 hours a day, so that a person may choose whatever would be most helpful and healing. 

The University urges anyone who has experienced sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking to seek support as soon as possible to minimize and treat physical harm, assist with processing the unique and complex emotional aftermath, and help preserve and understand options for pressing charges. Individuals have many options with regard to reporting sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including reporting to the University of Chicago Police Department, the Chicago Police Department, and to various campus authorities. Additionally, victims have recourse through the civil and criminal court systems, by being able to seek orders of protection, no contact orders and other similar court orders. Victims also have the option to decline to notify such authorities. 

Even for someone who does not wish to report the event to the police or pursue disciplinary action, seeking medical attention as soon as possible is important. Victims should be aware of the importance of preserving evidence, which may be necessary to the proof of criminal sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, or to obtain an order of protection.

Resources for Everyone

University of Chicago Medicine's Mitchell Emergency Room: Medical and Counseling Services: 773-702-6250, 901 East 58th St. (24-hours)

The Mitchell Emergency Room follows specific policies and procedures, approved by the State, in treating an individual who has been sexually assaulted. The State will pay for emergency room care for victims who have been sexually assaulted and do not have health insurance; if a victim provides health insurance information to the emergency room, the emergency room will bill the insurance company and the policy holder will be notified as usual.

•        The victim is placed in a private room.

•        Medical care is given as soon as possible.

•        A Sexual Assault Survivor Advocate or a Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call (for a student) may be called based on a victim's preferences.

•        By law, city police are notified, and the victim may choose to file a report.

University of Chicago Police Department: 773-702-8181 or 1-2-3 from a campus phone (24-hours)

The University of Chicago Police Department (UCPD) urges anyone who has been sexually assaulted to call immediately in order to strengthen the likelihood of successful prosecution. A UCPD officer can be summoned by calling 773.702.8181, pressing the red button on any of the emergency phones located throughout the community, or coming directly to the UCPD office at 6054 South Drexel Ave. 

Responsibilities of the UCPD include:

•        Attending to the immediate needs of the victim, including personal safety and prompt medical care

•        When appropriate, broadcasting a description of the offender

•        Notifying the Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call if the victim is a student

•        Providing victims with information concerning the importance of preserving evidence, and the rights of victims and the University’s responsibilities regarding orders of protection, no contact orders, and other similar court orders

The UCPD recommends the prompt reporting of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. Nevertheless, individuals should not be reluctant to file a report at a later date. Reporting an incident does not obligate a person to press charges.

Chicago Police Department: 911 (24-hours) or 9-911 from a campus phone

Anyone preferring not to report a matter to the University of Chicago Police Department may contact the Chicago Police Department.

Religious Organizations

A variety of groups offer pastoral care and a community of faith to address individual needs. For more information, visit http://spirit.uchicago.edu/

The University of Chicago Coordinating Officer: 773-702-5671, aali@uchicago.edu

The Coordinating Officer for the Policy on Unlawful Discrimination and Sexual Misconduct is the Associate Provost and Affirmative Action Officer, Title IX Coordinator for the University, Equal Opportunity Coordinator, and 504/ADA Coordinator. Questions about this policy or concerns regarding unlawful discrimination and sexual misconduct may be directed to Aneesah Ali, 5801 S. Ellis Ave., Levi Hall 510.

Resources for Students

Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call: 773-702-8181, via University Police (24-hours) or 773-834-HELP (4357), a direct paging system.

At any time, students may contact a Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call, who is trained to respond to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking emergencies. A student may contact this Dean-on-Call even if he or she has not decided yet whether to report the sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking to the police. The Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call is available to answer any general or personal questions related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, and can help with:

•        Finding emotional support

•        Getting medical care

•        Reporting the crime to the police

•        Preserving evidence, and, pressing charges

•        Obtaining information regarding the rights of victims and the University's responsibilities regarding orders of protection, no contact orders, and other similar court orders.

•        Adjusting living arrangements

•        Managing academic obligations

•        Getting counseling

•        Referring complaints of harassment to an unlawful harassment Complaint Advisor

For more information, visit, http://csl.uchicago.edu/get-help/sexual-abuse-assault/sexual-assault-dean-call-program.

Student Health Service: 773-702-4156, 860 E. 59th Street, R-100

Physicians and certified nurse practitioners provide for students ongoing follow-up health care and services, including pregnancy testing, counseling, and referral services; and sexually transmitted disease testing, diagnosis, and treatment. There is a 24 hours a day advice line available to students for consultation.  While acute, immediate post-assault treatment is provided at the Mitchell Emergency Room, the Student Health Service offers follow-up care, including health care services for students who have chosen not seek care immediately after an assault.  For more information, visit healthcare.uchicago.edu.

Student Health Service nurse triage line: 773-702-1915

Student Counseling Service: 773-702-9800, 5737 S. University Ave. (SCS Staff Member-on-Call 24-hours)

SCS supports students who are working through an experience of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking, or questions about relationships and sexuality. Consultation with a staff member is available in person during regular business hours and by telephone for after-hours emergencies.  For more information, visit http://counseling.uchicago.edu/.

Dean of Students: 773-702-7770, 5801 S. Ellis Ave. (Campus and Student Life)

At any time, students may contact their area Dean of Students or Campus and Student Life. Deans of Students are available to help and work with students throughout the process, addressing short-term and long-term personal or academic issues that arise, including options for assistance with changing academic, living, transportation, and working situations if requested and available. http://csl.uchicago.edu/get-help/dean-call-program/area-dean-students.

Resources for Sexual Violence Prevention (RSVP): 773-834-7738

RSVP organizes interactive peer workshops and educational programs on acquaintance rape prevention, sexual violence, and gender issues.  For more information, visit http://csl.uchicago.edu/get-help/resources-sexual-violence-prevention.

Peer Health Educator: 773-702-8935

Organized by Health Promotion and Wellness, this group of students develops programs and presentation for students on a variety of sensitive subjects, including sexual health.  For more information, visit wellness.uchicago.edu.

Title IX Coordinator for Students: 773-834-9710, belinda@uchicago.edu

To raise concerns or to file a Title IX student complaint under our Unlawful Discrimination and Sexual Misconduct Policy or Title IX, contact Belinda Cortez Vazquez, Associate Dean of Students in the University for Student Affairs, Levi Hall 212.

College Programming Office: 773-702-8616

CPO presents an annual program called Sex Signals for incoming undergraduate students on issues of alcohol, dating, sex, and consent. http://cpo.uchicago.edu/.

Resources especially for Staff, Other Academic Appointees (OAA), and Faculty

Human Resources Employee/Labor Relations (for staff):                                                                                773-702-4411

Provost's Office (for faculty and OAA for concerns relating to sexual misconduct):            773-702-5671

Perspectives (Staff and Faculty Assistance Program) 24-hours:                                                   800-456-6327

Counseling services are provided to employees affected directly and indirectly by sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. http://www.perspectivesltd.com/

Non-University Resources for Everyone

Chicago Rape Crisis Hotline (24hours)                                                     

Immediate and long-term referrals, information, and counseling                              888-293-2080

LGBTQ Crisis Hotline (24hours)                                                                    

Information, counseling, and referrals                                                                   773-871-2273

Chicago Women's Health Center                                                                         

Gynecological care and counseling                                                                            773-935-6126

YWCA Metropolitan Chicago                                                                 

Counseling and legal advocacy                                                                                   312-372-6600

Parks Francis YWCA                                                                             

Counseling and legal advocacy                                                                                   773-955-3100

Center on Halsted                                                                                             

Services for the LGBTQ community                                                                             773-472-6469

Rape Victim Advocates                                                                                   

Counseling                                                                                                          312-443-9603

Mayor's Office for Domestic Violence (24 hours)                                   

Information and referrals                                                                                             877-863-6338

Chicago Bar Association                                                                                

Lawyer                                                                                                                                 312-554-2000

XII. YEARLY REPORT ON UNLAWFUL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL MISCONDUCT TO THE COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY SENATE

A yearly report will be made to the Council of the University Senate (1) detailing the number of different types of incidents of unlawful harassment and sexual misconduct brought to the attention of the University-wide Disciplinary Committee, Title IX Coordinators, Human Resources, the Complaint Advisors, and the Panel on Unlawful Harassment and (2) describing the goals of the University-wide program to prevent unlawful harassment and sexual misconduct and how those goals were implemented during the year. The report will be prepared by the Coordinating Officer and reviewed and approved by the Panel on Unlawful Harassment, the Chair of which will present it to the Council.

XIII. COMPLIANCE AND LOCATING THIS POLICY

Regulations Prohibiting Unlawful Discrimination

The University’s policy is consistent with federal, state, and local regulations governing non-discrimination and unlawful harassment including: the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (as amended), the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and1991, Executive Order 11246, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (as amended), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, the Illinois Human Rights Act, the City of Chicago Human Rights Ordinance, and the Cook County Human Rights Ordinance.

 [1] The crimes of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking were added by the SaVE Act provisions of VAWA (effective March 7, 2014) as crimes reportable under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”).  Pursuant to the Clery Act, these crimes will be reported beginning with the 2014-2015 Common Sense publication.

IDHR and IHRC Legal Recourse and Investigative/Complaint Process

A University of Chicago employee has the right to contact the Illinois Department of Human Rights (IDHR) for further information or to file a formal charge of unlawful discrimination or retaliation. Charges must be filed within 180 days of alleged sexual harassment or other alleged discrimination unless it is a continuing offense. An appeal process is available through the Illinois Human Rights Commission (IHRC) after IDHR has completed its investigation of the complaint. The investigative, charge, and complaint process, and legal recourse processes are described in more detail at http://www2.illinois.gov/dhr/FilingaCharge/Pages/Employment.aspx.

IDHR may be reached at:

IHRC may be reached at:

Illinois Department of Human Rights
100 W. Randolph St., 10th Flr.
Intake Unit
Chicago, IL 60601
(312) 814-6200
(866) 740-3953 (TTY)
 

Illinois Human Rights Commission
100 W. Randolph St., Suite 5-100
Chicago, IL 60601
(312) 814-6269
(312) 814-4760 (TTY)
 

Other IDHR Offices:

Other IHRC Office:

Springfield: (217) 785-5100
                (866) 740-3953 (TTY)
Marion:     (618) 993-7463
                (866) 740-3953 (TTY)

Springfield: (217) 785-4350
                (217) 557-1500 (TTY)

Access to Information on Discrimination and Sexual Misconduct

The University's policy on unlawful discrimination and sexual misconduct can be found in the Student Manual of University Policies and Regulations (http://studentmanual.uchicago.edu/) and on University Human Resources’ Web site (http://humanresources.uchicago.edu/fpg/index.shtml). The complete text of the University’s unlawful discrimination and sexual misconduct policy can also be found at  http://unlawfulharassment.uchicago.edu/page/policy-unlawful-discrimination-and-sexual-misconduct.

XIV. RELATED POLICIES

Human Resources Policy U601 (Treatment of Confidential Information)

http://hrservices.uchicago.edu/fpg/policies/600/p601.shtml

Human Resources Policy U 402-Counseling Service-Staff and Faculty Assistance Program

http://humanresources.uchicago.edu/fpg/policies/400/p402.shtml

University Disciplinary Systems for Students

https://studentmanual.sites.uchicago.edu/page/university-disciplinary-systems

Human Resources Policy U703-Progressive Corrective Action

http://humanresources.uchicago.edu/fpg/policies/700/p703.shtml

Human Resources Policy U208-Termination of Employment  

http://humanresources.uchicago.edu/fpg/policies/200/p208.shtml

Discipline for Faculty and Other Academic Appointees

http://facultyhandbook.uchicago.edu/page/termination-removal-cause

 

The Policy on Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment adopted by the Council of the University Senate, February 28, 2006 was integrated with the Policy on Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking effective July 1, 2014